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Earnings, occupational choice, and mobility in segmented labor markets of India by Shahidur R. Khandker

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Published by World Bank in Washington, D.C .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • India,
  • Bombay.

Subjects:

  • Labor market -- India -- Bombay.,
  • Poor -- Employment -- India -- Bombay.,
  • Occupational mobility -- India -- Bombay.,
  • Wages -- India -- Bombay.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references (p. 26-28).

StatementShahidur R. Khandker.
SeriesWorld Bank discussion papers,, 154
Classifications
LC ClassificationsHD5820.B6 K46 1992
The Physical Object
Paginationviii, 45 p. ;
Number of Pages45
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL1702449M
ISBN 100821320629
LC Control Number92003419

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Get this from a library! Earnings, occupational choice, and mobility in segmented labor markets of India. [Shahidur R Khandker]. Get this from a library! Earnings, occupational choice, and mobility in segmented labor markets of India. [Shahidur R Khandker] -- This paper, using labor market survey data from Bombay, attempts to identify factors that determine men's and women's earnings, occupational choices, and mobility in segmented labor markets of India. Earnings, occupational choice, and mobility in segmented labor markets of India (Inglês) Resumo This paper, using labor market survey data from Bombay, attempts to identify factors that determine men's and women's earnings, occupational choices, and mobility in segmented labor markets Cited by: Cited by: Samantha Watson, "Formalizing the Informal Economy: Women’s Autonomous Self-Employment in Rural South India," Working Papers id, , Ragui, "Kinship ties, social networks, and segmented labor markets: evidence from the construction sector in Egypt," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(1), pages , February.

This paper, using labor market survey data from Bombay, attempts to identify factors that determine men's and women's earnings, occupational choices, and mobility in segmented labor markets of India. The paper develops a model that considers three categories of labor-protected wage, unprotected. No. Earnings, Occupational Choice, and Mobility in Segmented Labor Markets of India. Shahidur R. Khandker No. Managing External Debt in Developing Countries: Proceedings of a Joint Seminar, Jeddah, May Thomas M. Klein, editor No. Developing Agricultural Extension for Women Farmers. Katrine A. Saito and Daphne Spurling.   The earnings level, educational attainment, family size, the occupational choice, the career stage, the birth cohort, and the macroeconomic fluctuations significantly influence earnings mobility. In the United States, earnings mobility is significantly lower and gender differences are less pronounced than in Germany and Great Britain. AbstractThe present study contributes to the limited literature on labor.

1. Author(s): Khandker,S R Title(s): Earnings, occupational choice, and mobility in segmented labor markets of India/ S.R. Khandker. Country of Publication: United. Abstract. This chapter explores the character of the local rural–urban labour market, testing theories of labour market mobility and segmentation using a substantial survey from to along with field case material both in Arni and in nearby ‘suburban’ villages. The fraction of the human capital stock not used to produce additional human capital is used to produce earnings. Similar to Roy (), an individual’s earnings at any age is the product of a market determined price of a unit of human capital and the individual’s stock of human capital not used in investment at that age. Schooling, in this framework, is viewed as a period of full-time investment (no earnings) and . labor market differences existing across these countries, these economies represent relatively flexible labor markets, in sharp contrast with the segmented labor markets found in southern European countries, transition economies or developing countries.2 Most of these studies find that after an initial adaptation period, immigrants’ earnings.